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Adrian Brun

born in 1970, Luján, Argentina, currently lives and works in Berlin, Germany

HB VI Saitama Artist


Adrian Brun's work mainly reflects on the exploration of the body, organic systems, sexuality and physiology. Studying and working as a surgeon for several years had a huge impact on his creative practice. He has since developed an individual sculptural language that visualizes a physical and spiritual fascination with human biology and the wonder and mystery of the reproductive system. Adrian's installations, video and live performances articulate the strife of the body against its built-in limitations, the desire, physique politics and studies of polymorphous sexualities. Aiming at building a mythological parody that probes dilemmas and traumas which still shape our time. 


Adrian Brun graduated from Medicine School and became a surgeon at the age of 27. After several years of working in the operating room Adrian Brun moved to The Netherlands where he gave up his profession as a surgeon to initiate his artistic career. Started the BA Fine Art, HKU Utrecht and graduated as visual artist in 2008. His work has been exhibited at Museo de Bellas Artes, Buenos Aires (AR) and Biennale d’art Contemporain, Lyon (FR). Currenly lives and works in Berlin as visual artist and curator. His practice encompasses installations, sculptures and live/video performances. 

adrianbrun.com



Description of work created at HB Saitama 2015:

​AMORPHOPHALLUS KONNYAKU - 創造へのオマージュ Performative Intstallation
(konnyaku jelly, wood, needles, print on paper)
パフォーマンスのインストール こんにゃく、木材、針、紙印刷 


For hundreds of years, February 8 has been celebrated as Hari Kuyo - Festival of Broken Needles - in Japan. Hari means needle and Kuyo means memorial service.

The ritual has been practiced since the beginning of the Edo period (seventeenth-nineteenth centuries), when sewing was one of the most important skills for women.

Kimono-makers, seamstresses, tailors and embroiderers bring their broken or worn needles and pins that have served them through the past year to both Shinto shrines and Buddhist temples to honor them and "lay them to rest".

In former times, people either took the needles to a temple or set them afloat on a river or in the sea. In some ocations, the rituals were carried out at home or at the workplace itself. In several temple grounds, there were stone boxes into which old needles could be put at any time. It seems, then, that people used to dispose their needles as soon as they had become unusable, a custom that had the practical benefit of ensuring that the needles would not be left around and accidentally hurt someone. If there was no needle-receivment temple or shrine nearby, there was often a local custom for the disposal of nee- dles.

Prayers of thanks and respect are offered to thank the precious tools for their service. They are then plunged into a slab of konjac or tofu to soothe them after their hard work, and to protect their sharp points, preventing them doing any harm before they are laid to rest.

Women crowded around a big slab of tofu spiked with a multitude of colorful pins in front of the temple, purifying themselves with incense, praying and carefully adding their own needles as a group of monks chanted in the background.

By offering prayers and showing respect, it is hoped that the needle will pass it's energy to the owner and make them a better stitcher in the coming year, to improve their skills and to regain creativity in their vocations.

Nowadays, Hary Kuyo is usually performed on fixed dates, in most cases the eighth of February or December. The current common practice which has lost value during the last years, is to bring the needles to a temple or shrine where the ritual is performed. In some cases the ritual is carried out not in a temple or a shrine, but in a business or a sewing school, in which one or more priests come to perform the ceremony.

Some people still perform Hary Kuyo privately without attending a religious ceremony. During the ritual, worshipers pray for safety while sewing and to achieve greater skills and creativity. 




Letter Home:


16th of November, 2015

Saitama, Japan.

22:44

For hundreds of years, February 8 has been celebrated as Hari Kuyo -Festival of Broken Needles- in Japan. Kimono makers, seamstresses, tailors and embroiderers bring their broken or worn needles that have served them through the past year to both Shinto shrines and Buddhist temples to honor them and "lay them to rest". By offering prayers and showing respect, it is hoped that the needle will pass it's energy to the owner and make them a better stitcher in the future, improve their skills and regain creativity in their vocations.

                                                                          Oda to creativity

In almost everything we do, we can change old relationships into new arrangements, add new items or forms to existing structures, find new ways of dealing with banal daily matters like discovering a shortcut to get to a train station on time, or find new horizons overseas searching for a greater or a more meaningful life, or simply to look for a new beginning where life is just possible.

Creativity is a constructive process which results in the production of essentially a new something. A new or a different object, a thing, a commodity, a being or even a new existence. It is also connecting things or individuals. It is seeing or expressing new correspondences.

The ability to create is not only limited to the objects of everyday use, it is as well an instrument for increasing knowledge, possible in all areas of life such as thinking, working, playing or social interaction. It is the quality that we bring to the activity we are doing. It is an attitude, an inner approach – how we look at things.

According to Guilford’s divergent thinking, creativity involves at least three conditions: (1) Production of a novel idea or a response, (2) this idea must solve a problem or accomplish some goal and (3) the original insights must be sustained and developed to the full.

Creativity is extended over a period of time than limited to a brief episode. It is characterized by originality, adaptiveness and realization and it is not equivalent to intelligence.

It is found that development of creativity involves genetic as well as environmental factors. Though we cannot alter genetic components, we can reshape behavior through manipulation of the environment we inhabit. Culture, family atmosphere and education play significant roles in the development of creative talent. Creativity flourishes when creative behavior is encouraged.

The preservation of our way of life and our future security depends not only upon our intellectual resources but as well on our creative ability.Lets celebrate, breed, exercise and foster it.